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When it’s on, the best bring their mojo

Mojo Medical Bags optimize medical readiness at point of injury for every responder across today’s complex range of tactical scenarios.

You and your mojo equals the ability to effectively treat a casualty when operational circumstances are predictably unpredictable. Incoming fire, darkness, environmental factors (heat, cold, altitude) and delays to definitive care threaten survivability and mission success. When seconds count, mojo Medical Bags optimize medical readiness at point of injury for every responder across today’s complex range of tactical scenarios.

Intuitive design, badass tactical medical gear, rigorous training and your mojo all come together to have an immediate impact on combat casualty care. Equipped to help reduce combat mortality during the Golden Hour and during every phase of pre-hospital care, there is a mojo Medical Bag for every skill level, every mission and every environment.

 
 

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SAVE LIVES AND EMULATE SUCCESS

Patients that arrive alive at a Role 3 military treatment facility have a 98% chance of survival. Those that reach Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany have greater than 99% survival rate. While these statistics demonstrate optimistic survival rates in the later phases of care, the biggest opportunity to positively impact survival occurs pre-hospital during tactical combat casualty care.

The US Army 75th Ranger Regiment trains rigorously and routinely uses data to improve their casualty response systems. As a result, they are the only US military unit that can demonstrate no potentially preventable deaths in the pre-hospital setting after more than a decade of combat. This is in stark contrast to the deaths deemed potentially survivable in the military at-large. 4,596 is the total number of combat deaths studied by Col Eastridge, et. al., during the 10 year period from September, 2001 through June, 2011. 4,061 casualties or 87.3% died before reaching a hospital. Of these deaths, 976 (24.3%) died from injuries deemed “potentially survivable”. These 976 US and coalition service members who died that might have lived represent where we can make the biggest difference in improving patient outcomes.